Differences in representative labour income per hour between workers with a middle or higher level of education with respect to workers with basic education

This indicator measures the average labour income differences between workers with middle or higher education with respect to workers that only completed basic education. The indicator is also presented by age groups, insofar as younger workers are usually concentrated into the low wage deciles, while adult workers are more concentrated in high wage deciles.

The representative labour income refers to the median labour income, i.e., the value of the labour income that divides the number of workers into two equal groups: the group of workers with a labour income above that value and the group of workers with labour income above that value. Given the existence of significant differences between countries in the participation of women in the labour market, it has been decided to compare only the labour income of men. This avoids any bias derived from comparing women’s salaries between countries.

You may also find interesting

Report

Education

Education

Education

Do we have quality education? In this report we analyse three fundamental dimensions: access to sufficient educational level, obtaining of adequate knowledge to contribute to economic and social development, and degree of inclusion of the education system.

Article

Applicants and awardees of the ”la Caixa” Grants programme: who are they?

Applicants and awardees of the ”la Caixa” Grants programme: who are they?

Education

The “la Caixa” Banking Foundation grants programme, which funds postgraduate studies, has a major impact on the careers of its beneficiaries. Who applies for these grants and what factors determine to whom they are awarded?

Article

Training for employed people: the need for expansion and improvement

Training for employed people: the need for expansion and improvement

Education

Training workers is vital for improving their employability. However, since the economic crisis, investment in training has fallen by 50% in Spain and social agents barely participate in the definition of continuous training actions.