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Young people and the labour market

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The evolution of employment precarity among young people in Spain, 2008-2018

Labour precarity among young people especially affects women. They occupy worse-paid positions with higher rates of temporary work than men.

Report

Analysis of social needs of youth

A lack of professional opportunities and labour precarity mean that young people are very vulnerable to economic crises. What were the circumstances of this group prior to covid-19?

Article

The enduring impact of the economic crisis on child poverty

Despite the economic recovery, in 2018 three out of every ten children were living in a situation of anchored poverty. Poverty during childhood has consequences throughout life. We analyse its impact.

Infodata

Social exclusion from the labour market

The difference in unemployment rates between men and women in our country is larger than the European average. How has it evolved during the recent years of economic crisis?

Article

Why are there fewer women in manual occupations?

Two out of every three workers in manual occupations are men, and women continue to be a minority in occupations such as construction, and industry. What factors influence segregation by gender in the labour market?

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Involuntary and dependent self-employment in Spain

Involuntary and dependent self-employment in Spain

Social Inclusion

Involuntary self-employment in Spain (21.7% of self-employed people) exceeded the European average (16.9%) in 2017. This study indicates that involuntary self-employment is common among young people and people with a low educational level.

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Being a micro-influencer: an unsustainable activity for young people

Being a micro-influencer: an unsustainable activity for young people

Social Inclusion

Does it pay to be a micro-influencer? Some 62% of those interviewed in this study are dissatisfied with their earnings in relation to the impact that they generate in their communities.

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Immigrants’ names as an initial factor of discrimination

Immigrants’ names as an initial factor of discrimination

Social Inclusion

An experiment with an amateur football team reveals difficulties in social integration for people of foreign origin. When faced with similar profiles, team managers tended towards choosing players with local names.