Does the native population move out of neighbourhoods where immigrants move in?

The mass wave of migration that reached Spain between 1998 and 2008 did not increase overall segregation in residential areas

Jesús Fernández-Huertas, UC3M
Ada Ferrer i Carbonell, IAE-CSIC, Barcelona GSE, IZA
Albert Saiz, MIT
Adaptation: Jordi Pueyo

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Jesús Fernández-Huertas , UC3M
Ada Ferrer i Carbonell , IAE-CSIC, Barcelona GSE, IZA
Albert Saiz , MIT
Adaptation: Jordi Pueyo

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