Employment situation and family background in Europe during the crisis: we are not all equal

Silvia Avram, University of Essex
Olga Cantó, University of Alcalá and Equalitas network

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Silvia Avram , University of Essex
Olga Cantó , University of Alcalá and Equalitas network

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