null Young people (aged 15 to 29) who neither study nor work

Young people (aged 15 to 29) who neither study nor work

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Early leavers from education and training reflect social inequalities

What factors increase the likelihood of students dropping out? Poor grades are not the only indicator of early drop-out.

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Whom do we trust?

Does ethnic discrimination exist in the second-hand market online? This study analyses its presence in transactions between buyers and sellers in Spain.

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Remedial education for primary-school children: a useful measure for immigrant pupils?

Do remedial education programmes aimed at students from underprivileged groups work? This study shows that they only manage to benefit immigrant pupils if the proportion of them in the school group does not exceed 50%.

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Are policies designed to prevent early school leaving working in Spain?

Is the Learning and Performance Improvement Programme (PMAR) effective for the prevention of early school leaving? According to this study, participating in the PMAR increases the probability of obtaining an ESO qualification by 12%.

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The presence of immigrants in local politics is well below their demographic weight in Spanish society

Do municipal councils in Spain reflect the diversity of origins of the population? We analyse access to local politics for immigrants and whether differences exist between the different foreign groups.

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Paid and unpaid work: the pandemic intensifies the phenomenon of double shift among women

Paid and unpaid work: the pandemic intensifies the phenomenon of double shift among women

Social Inclusion

According to this study, the gender gap in total hours of work, paid and unpaid, has increased to 16 hours during the pandemic.

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Regularising the situation of the immigrant population does not result in a “call ef-fect”

Regularising the situation of the immigrant population does not result in a “call ef-fect”

Social Inclusion

What were the consequences of the regularisation, in 2005, of 600,000 non-EU immigrants who were working in Spain? This study reveals that it did not lead to any “call effect”, but did lead to increased tax revenues.

Infodata

Disproportionate housing costs

Disproportionate housing costs

Social Inclusion

Some 30.4% of people of foreign origin live in households in which their housing costs exceed 40% of their disposable income.